Cheap Breadboard Arduino with Wireless Module

I see that there is a good amount of demand in the community for a cheap “Arduino” clone with wireless. Many people, while grateful of the Arduino community and organizers, are frustrated, because everything seems so darn’ expensive! $30 Arduino Board + $20 wireless thing + $15 proto board makes almost $100 just to get you running. If you somehow found JeeNodes, they are $23. A RBBB, which just has the processor, is $13. We can do better than that though!

If you’ve clicked on the caption, you’ll see that it is possible to make a breadboard Arduino for just $7. The problem is that we still need a wireless module. XBee’s retail for $23, which is a pretty robust solution (configurable up to 19200 baud in real world situations, can communicate just with serial, standard footprint so there are lots of cheap adapters for it). But it’s expensive. You can check out the RF Bee, which is a $20 wireless solution, which actually contains an Atmega168 (running Arduino)! It’s tiny form factor is awesome, but it is $20. A RFM12B radio retails for about $6, which is pretty decent. It even has a good library for Arduino to go with it. But we can do better.

How about a $2.50 wireless module, that has a good library to go with it? That would bring our cost to $9.50, excluding shipping. That’s my cup of coffee. The hard part is finding the individual components you need, which I will help you out. Finding the cheapest parts from 20 different places is great, but the shipping will kill you. I’ll attempt to minimize the shipping cost, by ordering from a few places, getting what we need from each.

Parts:

Extra:

That brings the total for the required parts to $5.44…  wow.  Shipping would be about $5 from each place (roughly), but it isn’t included in our consideration.  Getting some different colored wire wrapping wire will help you out a lot, as well as getting a wire wrapping tool (which can be very useful).  Adding the $2.50 wireless module would bring you to $8, pretty nice!  This number scales down as you buy more, so if you buy enough parts to build 3 or 5 of them, it will be cheaper. Consider the pricing levels of the ATmega328p chips to figure out how many you should buy (you should always get spare protoboards 😛 )

I’ll do a post sometime soon on my recommended set of parts to have.  A quick update on the Carduino: I still haven’t put it in, I need to get up the motivation to start modifying wires and integrating it into my car.  I know eventually I’ll get to it, but in the mean time, I’m exploring the idea of making my own Watt Meter, with SD logging.  It would be hard to compete with that, but if I’m smart, I can end up with a meter that can work in RV’s, like this one does, using an external Shunt (small value, high wattage, precision resistor).  Till then!

Edit:  If I could make a schematic for this cheap Arduino breadboard, I would take the parts required to make it work, and customize it for each application after it.  The arduino is great as a platform, but for completed projects, typically the soldering connection is constant.    Here is a quick guide on wiring up the nRF24L01+ to a Arduino.  By following the Instructables post, you can get a general idea of how to wire it up.  I got the idea for the voltage regulator + resonator from JeeLabs, so the v5 schematic would be what you use to wire up the rest of it.  I hope this helps!

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4 thoughts on “Cheap Breadboard Arduino with Wireless Module

    • I added the last paragraph to highlight how I would make a schematic from the given parts. It involves mostly looking at the Instructables article, adding the wireless using the linked article, and putting the resonator + voltage regulator in correctly using the JeeNode schematic.

      A little unconventional, but I hope it helps. If you want, I can put up a schematic showing everything together (because I know it can help). Let me know 🙂

      • Yes, please do put up a schematic. The Instructables link uses a completly different parts list then what you have laid out. So even just the breadboard arduino part would be great with some notes on how to attach the wireless portion.
        Thanks!

  1. nRF24L01 radio needs a 3.3 volt supply so you have to add a regulator and cap – the nRF24L01 has a weird connector that is not breadboard friendly – wish i could find a generiic adapret that would let you plug this little gem into a breadboard.

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